Friday, June 29, 2012

Friday: Upcycle Old Lace and Broken Picture into a DIY Monthly Calender

This is a great way to repurpose a few old things you might have lying around- like a broken picture or some lace. Which I had. This picture here was a framed posted but no glass- if you have a picture where the glass has broken out, this would be a good use for it. First, pick a base color you like and paint the entire inside of the picture. Second, Cover the frame of the picture with painters tape to protect it, because...Third, you need to tape on a piece of old lace. Fourth, spray paint the entire picture lightly, then remove the lace and position a piece here and there, spray painting a little more each time, until you achieve the exact look of stenciled lace that you want. Fifth, place a few colored squares of paper onto your board using painters tape (so they can be removed without damaging the background). Get creative. I used a few for pictures and then one large piece for a calender. Sixth, print out a calender and get a few pictures together. Again, using the painter's tape, attach a few photos and a calender. Seventh. Guess what? You're all done! Not too tough now, is it? And since you used painter's tape on the photos and calender, you can switch them out as desired from time to time. I put a larger photo of the finished product at the bottom of this post so you can see it better. I was really pleased with how this turned out, especially since it saved me a small bundle in purchasing my own wall calender for my fam! (And I for SURE need a calender to remember everything in life!)

Thursday, June 28, 2012

Thursday: Texas Roadhouse Cinnamon Butter

This Texas Roadhouse cinnamon butter recipe is simple and, like most things made up entirely of sugar and butter, absolutely delicious. Perfect with hot rolls and white bread (like I was making today....)

Ingredients
1 cup butter (softened, room temperature)
1/2 cup powdered sugar
1/3 cup honey
2 tsp cinnamon


Whip the butter using an electric mixer and, when fluffy, add in the sugar, honey, and cinnamon. You can use it right away, or store it in the refrigerator for later use. Mmmmmm. Yum!



Don't you just wanna eat it?

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Wednesday: DIY OxyClean at Home!

This DIY OxyClean is inexpensive, works well, and is simple. It is definitely something that, once you know it, you'll want to continue using it for the rest of your life. It is especially perfect for whitening without bleach when you need to whiten a delicate fabric that you wouldn't dare to bleach with any kind of harsh chemicals. It is a very gentle cleaner for stains, too. There are two ways to use it and only two ingredients.

*Hydrogen peroxide
*Baking soda

For spot cleaning, mix hydrogen peroxide and baking soda together until they have a paste-like consistency and then apply it to the area you want cleaned/whitened. Scrub it into the fabric with a sponge or cloth, then rinse with water once it's cleaned.

For INTENSIVE cleaning action, mix 1 baking soda with 3 parts hydrogen peroxide (enough to cover the article of clothing you want to clean/whiten) in a pan on the stove over medium high heat.

Boil the clothing in this mixture, stirring often to prevent the bubbles from boiling over. Continue to stir until the fabric is white/stains are gone, etc. Then, wash the clothing as normal.

For my example, I used the boiling method on a piece of antique lace that had yellowed. In the picture (kinda hard to tell), I put it next to another piece of antique lace that was the same color it had been, so that you could get kind of a before-after view of it. I was very, VERY pleasantly surprised at how well it worked. Honestly, I'd say this DIY is better than Oxy Clean. I already have a big batch of un-cleanable stained clothes ready to go for round of boiling clean!




UPDATE! I have been accumlating clean but stained clothes for about a month, then mixed up a batch of DIY OxyClean to use on them. This time around, I added the paste, then squirted a bait of additional hydrogen peroxide on them (since the moment the paste hits your clothes, they suck up the liquid) and then rubbed it in thoroughly. I let the entire pile sit like this for about eight hours, then washed them. BOOM! Goodbye stains- blood, milk, spit-up, grass, pit stains (gross!) and, of course, mystery stains. Folding my laundry was like Christmas because I was so excited to see which stains came out. Aside from one mystery stain on a white shirt that only faded 90%, everything else cameout perfect! SO sweet.

Enjoy the before and afters!
Dirt on the back of my shirt from playing in the grass outside
Raspberries on my baby's onesie (and yes, this is the DIY baby onesie bikini-
I have to say, it washes really well and looks awesome even after months of use!)
DIY Baby Onesie Bikini
Sorry for the weird angle- these two spots were in my shirt for months- you
can see one is gone completely, while the other one is smaller and faded. I
think if I do it again but let it sit a few hours longer, it will take out the second one.
I hope, at least!

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Tuesday: How to Clean a Greasy, Dirty, Caked on Pan WITHOUT Crazy Chemicals or Tough Scrubbing

Wanted to show it half done..
My before
This is easy. Unbelievably easy. I took pictures as my proof- but you'll have to try it at home to know for sure yourself.

All you have to do is cover the dirty part of the pan with water and a squirt of dish soap. Then, put your pan on the stove and turn the heat up until the water is boiling. Let it boil for a few minutes but make sure that the water doesn't all evaporate out. Then, dump out the boiling water and use a soapy sponge or dish cloth to wash the entire thing clean.

So easy to remove what used to be crusted on food. For my example, I used a pan that I cooked bacon in the night before, so mine was caked on greasey-grossy.

Keep in mind, you only need a squirt of dish soap, a little water, and a soft cloth!

Monday, June 25, 2012

Monday: Ode to Single Mothers

You may see me stare at you
And gasp, with mouth agape
Then you may see me turn around
And whisper with my mate


You may feel judged, unworthy
Then weak or filled with blame
For anger may rush through you
As you stand, with heart ashamed


But listen close, dear mother
To what I tell my spouse
It isn't of faults, oh no,
But the goodness in your house


I begin, "Look at her strength
The load she bears so well
She plays ma and pa together
Her children cannot tell


Of the courage and love it takes,
The will with which she fights
When a child wakes for comfort
She alone dries tears at night."


So, please feel no ill as I watch,
And know that as I am standing,
I stare for envy, for shock and for awe,
At your kindness, your strength, and commanding


Friday, June 22, 2012

Friday: DIY Vases: Using Lace as a Paint Stencil

DEFINATELY like this better than the original
This is more of an idea share- really easy and good results. Find some old lace, whether it is faded, holey, moth eaten, whatever the case may be, use it as a stencil with some spray paint! Here, I used it on a pair of plain red glass vases that my husband had purchased for me.
All I had to do was to hold the top lightly with my hand, drape lace on top of the part I was decorating, then spray lightly. Definitely practice on some newspapers first, but DO spray lightly. Then, turn the vase and the lace and spray again. Takes just a few minutes and the results are great! Best of luck to you for all of your projects!
Drape that lace!

Thursday, June 21, 2012

Extras: Lord of the Rings Babysitters

Don't know WHAT it is about this picture, but it is so funny

Thursday: 5 Ingredient Lemonade Pie


This is a nice summer treat- perfect for barbecues or picnics. And, of course, you can accompany it with a glass of lemonade... or just of milk. Enjoy!

Ingredients

*1 can Western Family sweetened condensed milk

*4 egg yolks

*1/2 cup white sugar

*1/2 cup lemon juice

*graham cracker crust

Mix the lemon juice and sugar until the sugar is completely dissolved. Then, add the sweetened condensed milk and egg yolks and mix until smooth.

Pour into a graham cracker crust. Bake at 350 for 15-20 minutes or until the center becomes firm. Garnish with graham cracker crumbs and a slice of lemon. That's it! Gotta love pie recipes that are, indeed, easy as pie.

***If you prefer to make your crust from scratch, rather than use a ready-made one from the store, just follow the simple instructions in this 2-minute video. Making a Graham Cracker Crust

Extras: DIY Homemade Mouthwash

I will admit to some trial and error before I found this DIY mouthwash. Just know that I tasted some pretty nasty brews before this decent tasting mouthwash was discovered. The needed ingredients are few and the flavor is ok. Which is really the best you can say for ANY mouthwash- that the flavor is ok. But, since we use baking soda, it deodorizes your mouth, ridding it of funky smells instead of masking it with mint. And, hey, the price is right!

*1 cup water
*1 tb baking soda
*5-8 drops peppermint/mint essential oil
*Some kind of sealable container to keep it in

Mix it, gargle it, and enjoy the breath-freshening, and low price, of this DIY mouthwash.

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Wednesday: 10 Movie to See Before You Die

Here is a list of 10 movies to see before you die. Why? Because they are not JUST pure entertainment sludge. While you WILL enjoy them and be glad you saw them, they also inspire and uplift, make you think, and will help you have a broader perspective on life. I wanted to make up this list because, as you should know, just because a movie is a huge box office hit or makes billions of dollars, it is not necessarily anything more than pure entertainment. If you are sensitive in your movie choices, some of these may best be viewed in an edited format. So here it is. 10 movies to see before you die, but not necessarily in any order.



These movies were chosen for
*Helping you understand a different world
*Showcasing the good in mankind when in opposition
*Inspiring you against weakness, evil, and small mindedness


The Pursuit of Happyness
A struggling salesman takes custody of his son as he's poised to begin a life-changing professional endeavor.

Luther
During the early 16th Century idealistic German monk Martin Luther, disgusted by the materialism in the church, begins the dialogue that will lead to the Protestant Reformation.

Schindler's List
In Poland during World War II, Oskar Schindler gradually becomes concerned for his Jewish workforce after witnessing their persecution by the Nazis.

Hotel Rwanda
The true-life story of Paul Rusesabagina, a hotel manager who housed over a thousand Tutsi refugees during their struggle against the Hutu militia in Rwanda.

Seven Pounds
An aerospace engineer with a fateful secret embarks on an extraordinary journey of redemption by forever changing the lives of seven strangers.

Life is Beautiful
A Jewish man has a wonderful romance with the help of his humour, but must use that same quality to protect his son in a Nazi death camp.

Amazing Grace
The idealist William Wilberforce maneuvers his way through Parliament, endeavoring to end the British transatlantic slave trade.

Gladiator
When a Roman general is betrayed and his family murdered by an emperor's corrupt son, he comes to Rome as a gladiator to seek revenge.

Anna and the King
The story of the romance between the King of Siam and the widowed British schoolteacher Anna Leonowens during the 1860's.

The Last Samurai
An American military advisor embraces the Samurai culture he was hired to destroy after he is captured in battle.


Movie descriptions courtesy of IMDb

Wednesday: 10 Movies to See Before You Die

Here is a list of 10 movies to see before you die. Why? Because they are not JUST pure entertainment sludge. While you WILL enjoy them and be glad you saw them, they also inspire and uplift, make you think, and will help you have a broader perspective on life. I wanted to make up this list because, as you should know, just because a movie is a huge box office hit or makes billions of dollars, it is not necessarily anything more than pure entertainment. If you are sensitive in your movie choices, some of these may best be viewed in an edited format. So here it is. 10 movies to see before you die, but not necessarily in any order.



These movies were chosen for
*Helping you understand a different world
*Showcasing the good in mankind when in opposition
*Inspiring you against weakness, evil, and small mindedness


The Pursuit of Happyness
A struggling salesman takes custody of his son as he's poised to begin a life-changing professional endeavor.

Luther
During the early 16th Century idealistic German monk Martin Luther, disgusted by the materialism in the church, begins the dialogue that will lead to the Protestant Reformation.

Schindler's List
In Poland during World War II, Oskar Schindler gradually becomes concerned for his Jewish workforce after witnessing their persecution by the Nazis.

Hotel Rwanda
The true-life story of Paul Rusesabagina, a hotel manager who housed over a thousand Tutsi refugees during their struggle against the Hutu militia in Rwanda.

Seven Pounds
An aerospace engineer with a fateful secret embarks on an extraordinary journey of redemption by forever changing the lives of seven strangers.

Life is Beautiful
A Jewish man has a wonderful romance with the help of his humour, but must use that same quality to protect his son in a Nazi death camp.

Amazing Grace
The idealist William Wilberforce maneuvers his way through Parliament, endeavoring to end the British transatlantic slave trade.

Gladiator
When a Roman general is betrayed and his family murdered by an emperor's corrupt son, he comes to Rome as a gladiator to seek revenge.

Anna and the King
The story of the romance between the King of Siam and the widowed British schoolteacher Anna Leonowens during the 1860's.

The Last Samurai
An American military advisor embraces the Samurai culture he was hired to destroy after he is captured in battle.


Movie descriptions courtesy of IMDb

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Best. Shave. Ever.

This is easy and SO worth trying. When you shave, use Nair instead of shaving cream, soap, or even conditioner. Though I'm not a fan of using it for hair removal, it will give you the smoothest, softest, closest shave. You may just get addicted. ;)

Tuesday: How to Get into College- And What to Expect in College Once You Get There

The basis of this post is to explain how colleges and universities work- all those random details that everyone assumes you already know but you just might not. A skim through this article will help you in tackling the challenges ahead if you are, indeed, college bound.

What, exactly, IS a college? What is the difference between a college and a university?
In the U.S., we refer to both colleges and universities as simply 'college', but they are not actually the same thing. A college is a higher level learning institution that may award Associates, Bachelors, and sometimes Masters degrees. A single college will only offer degrees under one umbrella; that is to say, a social sciences college will only offer social science degrees, psychology, sociology, and the like. A slightly larger college may actually be comprised of several 'colleges' or schools, meaning that they might have a school (also referred to as a college) of social sciences and a school of mathematics, so then they could award degrees in psychology, sociology, mathematics, and accounting but NOT degrees in law, medicine, etc., because they don't have a school for them. A university is made of several colleges, allowing them to award degrees in many areas. A university will also almost always have schools for Master's and PhD degrees.

Associates? Bachelors? What do these MEAN exactly?
Degrees are awarded for learning that has taken place; when a certain number of credits in a certain area have been completed with sufficient grades, a degree will be given.

*Associates* Usually 2 years or 4 semesters of full-time school and around 60 credit hours
*Bachelors* Usually 4 years or 8 semesters of full-time school and around 120 credit hours
*Masters* Usually 2-3 years or 4-6 semesters of full-time school and ranges between 60-90 credit hours on top of a bachelors degrees
*PhD* Usually 4 years or 8 semesters of full-time school and about 120 credit hours on top of a bachelors degree


What is a PhD?
It means doctor of philosophy.

How do semesters work?
There is some variance, depending on the school you attend, but there are typically 2 full semesters each year that are required for full time students and 1or 2 additional semesters/terms that are optional. Your typical school wants you to get in, get your study on, and get out, so without some kind of special arrangement, you will be required to attend 2 semesters out of the year. These semesters are usually fall and spring, with fall running from the beginning of September to December and spring running from the beginning of January to the end of April. From May to August, the school will offer classes for students that are looking to get extra credit hours between the main semesters.

How long is a credit hour?
A basic required class (history, math 101) will run about 3 credit hours. That means that each week, you will have about 3 hours in class, for example, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, one hour each day. Classes that require less effort may only be given 1 credit hour, for example a lecture series where you attend class Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, but are required only to be present and no homework is required. Many physical education classes offer only .5 or 1 credit hours, even though more time is spent in class.

What does it mean when they say 'History 101' or 'Math 250'?
Depending on your degree, there is a huge variety of classes that are both required and optional. There are so many different history classes that they need to be numbered so as to avoid confusion. Most courses that are in the 100s mean that they are first year classes and less complex. Most 200s are second year classes and slightly more difficult. 300s often require a previous class to be completed before you can enter it, for example, Math 350 may require you to have completed Math 110 before so that you are prepared for the coursework. 400s denote classes that are fourth year or the graduating year for bachelors degrees. 500s and 600s are intensive classes for students working on their master's degrees.
Sophomore? Senior? What?
First year students who are working on their 1st or 2nd semesters in school (or who have 0-30ish credits) are called freshmen. Second year students who are working on their 3rd or 4th semesters in school (or who have 30-60ish credits) are called sophomore. Third year students who are working on their 5th and 6th semesters in school (or with 60-90is credits) are called juniors. Fourth year students who are working on their 7th and 8th semesters in school (or with 90-120ish credits) are called senors.

How many classes for full time?
4-5 classes or 12-15 credit hours each semester is usually considered a full time student.

How do you get into college?
You apply. Each college or university can accept a certain number of students each year. Depending on the popularity of the college, it may get more applicants than there are spaces, just enough, or fewer applicants than there is room for. Each school looks for different things in their students and you should research the colleges that you are interested in to see if you meet their criteria. Simply go to the school's website, find their application, and start working on it.

What are the applications for college like?
Again, each school is looking for something different, but they will normally want to know a few of the same things.
Most universities will require:
*A transcript of your high school grades or your GED
*Your test scores of a standardized test, either ACT or SAT
*Extra curricular activies you have done- either clubs and extra activies in high school, or else programs and community events that you have done as an adult (plays, fundraisers, etc.)
*An essay- if this is required, the school you apply to will let you know what kind of information they are looking for in the essay
*Application fee (anywhere from $50 to $500)
Most small colleges will require:
*A transcript of your high school grades or your GED
*Your test scores of a standardized test, either ACT or SAT
*Application fee (usually less than a university)
Most universities have more applicants and are more difficult to get into than a college, which will typically have fewer applicants and are easier to get into.

SAT or ACT?
Some colleges/universities will accept either or, but generally, they will prefer one over the other. The following map is not true for every case, but generally if you attend a school in an orange state, the school will want you to take the SAT. If you attend school in a blue state, they will generally want you to take the ACT.
Is college worth it?
The answer to that depends on your reason for attending. If you want to go to school solely to become better informed about the world and to educate yourself, then the answer is certain yes. If it is merely for financial gain, then the answer is maybe. Some schools are 40,000 a semester, making the overall sum for a bachelors degree well over 160,000, not including books or housing. If your degree is not in a field that has the capability to earn that kind of a sum over 5-10 years time, you may want to consider a different degree or a different school.
College takes time, money, and energy, but is a worthwhile endeavor for the knowledge that you accrue IF you have the will power and means to finish.
College will
*increase your earning potential (no, not a guarantee)
*increase your understanding of the world
*increase gratitude as you realize how much you have received through the study of history
*decrease ignorance and prejudice
As a college graduate, there is very little that I would trade my time in school for. It certainly has assisted and increased my earnings, my knowledge, my interests, my social group, and my self worth. Would I recommend it whole heartedly? Yes. Is it for everyone? No. Not everyone will enjoy or appreciate what college has to offer- but I believe that nearly everyone should take a class or two to at least try it out.
How do you get started?
1- Figure out how much you can afford for school.
2- Decide where you want to go to school- in state, out of state, out of country, etc.
3- Search the Internet for schools that are in your budget and in the area you want.
4- Look at what kind of students each school wants and try to find the ones that seem to fit you best. 5- Apply to these schools and wait to see where you are accepted.
6- Once you have received acceptance letters to schools, think about where you feel like you will be happiest.
7- Inform the school you like best that you want to attend.
8- Meet with a school counselor/advisor. There are many counselors/advisers at each school- ones for each degree and ones for new, incoming students. Make an appointment with the counselor/advisor for incoming students and they can start to advise you on what classes are good to take.

What is a major?
A major is a set program for a certain degree. Depending on what you want to do with your education, the degree you want will be different. If you want to be an accountant, you will likely require a mathematics degree, so you will want to major in math. If you want to be a teacher, you will likely want a teaching degree, so you will to major in education. You don't need to decide your major when you first start and many people even change majors throughout school.

Can you do school with kids?
Answer: Yes. Is it easy? No. Many schools, especially state universities and smaller, local colleges offer so many online classes that it is possible to apply and get into their school but then take most of your classes 1 and 2 at a time online. Some classes will require you to attend the school itself, but these can be done at night and on the weekends. This method is perhaps the easiest for anyone who has children at home but wants to attend school.


How do you pay for college?
Like it or not, college is not free. If you are worried about expenses, a state college may be best, as the costs and fees are typically lowest there.
Colleges costs
*Tuition (paid each semester)
*Books (paid each semester)
*Housing (paid monthly)
*Food, transportation, etc.
Methods for paying for college
*Savings
*Cash from part-time/full-time jobs
*Grants (typically given/awarded when you apply for financial aid)
*Scholarships (typically awarded based on merit)
*School loans (normally they have generous pay-back plans)
Other questions about school/college/university? Post them as replies to this post and I will add extra paragraphs. Hope this helps anyone thinking about or just starting their college career.

Monday, June 18, 2012

Monday: Baby on the Go: 3 Ways to Slim Down Your Diaper Bag

Today's post is dedicated to moms (and dads) with kids in diapers. There are special considerations necessary for when you are on the go with your kids that are, let's face it, expensive, bulky, and ABSOLUTELY necessary.

So, to help alleviate some of the annoyance associated with getting everything together to take your little tike out, here are a few ideas to help you get out on the go- without weighing you down too much. It'd be nice to know this when packing your first diaper bag with your first kid or even when going on vacation and packing a diaper bag for the airport.

1. Stinky Diapers
It's gonna happen. 'Nough said. However, you sometimes may not be garbage-can adjacent when this occurs. Easy solution? Have a handful of plastic grocery sacks on hand to contain the unpleasant odor. Great way to haul them around?
*Cut an clean, empty plastic bottle in half around the middle
*Stuff the bottom bottom half with empty plastic bags
*Now, force the bottom half inside of the top half of the bottle and voila'! A compact container to carry plastic bags. Plastic bags are also great for blow-outs, so you have somewhere to put those dirty little onesies until you can get home to was them.

2. Diaper Rash Cream
Know what was fabulous? All those free samples of diaper rash cream when the baby was born- they were perfect for on the go! Now that they are gone, however, I needed to get creative to be able to get my own.
*Take a snack-sized zipper baggie and cut into 1/4ths. Next, use an iron to melt the opened sides together. Place a piece of paper over the area that you want to be sealed and just barely touch the iron to that area.
Diaper rash cream to go

*You now have a custom sized zippered container. Squeeze a small amount of diaper rash cream into it and you are ready to go!
3. Formula
1 hour. If you mix up a bottle, you have one hour until you're supposed to dump it or refrigerate it. Not a very large window. Make bottles on the go simple.
*Fill up a bottle with the amount of water you need for your normal bottle size (4oz, 6 oz, etc.)
*Using the same method as the diaper rash cream above, cut a snack sized zipper baggie in half and seal the open end, then put in a pre-measured amount of formula (2 scoops, 3 scoops, whatever)
*Now, when you're on the go and need a bottle it takes about three seconds and you're good to go!





*

Friday, June 15, 2012

Extras: Hollister...

You only laugh because you hate going to that story with all the trendy tweeny boppers, too.

Thursday, June 14, 2012

Thursday: My Thoughts on Eating and Harvesting Artichokes

My thoughts as I prepared and ate my first artichoke:

1- Who would have ever thought, when looking at that plant, that it would be edible?
2- Who figured out HOW to eat the very small amount of edible artichoke off of it?
3- Who named an artichoke an artichoke?

And most importantly:

WHO would eat an artichoke a second time after eating it once? TOTALLY not worth the effort. But that's just me.

BUT, if like me, you got all curious and want to know how to make and eat your own, try this website.

http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/how_to_cook_and_eat_an_artichoke/

It helped me. Good luck, have fun.

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Extras: Those Ecards....

Seriously.... so many sarcastic ecards....

Wednesday: DIY Brown Gravy Packet


NEW AND IMPROVED!

Say whaaaaaaaaaaaaat to easiness! Why waste money on packet brown gravies when you can make one up in seconds and it costs just a few cents?! Answer: You didn't know you could! Well, neither did I and, judging by the numerous packets of brown gravy in my cupboards, I could stand to save some money with DIY! Then, once you're done with your brown gravy packet, pour it on top of
PIMP: Perfectly Incredible Mashed Potatoes, also known as the best mashed potatoes you will ever eat in your life.

Ingredients
1/4 cup flour
1 T beef bouillon granules
1 tsp onion powder
1 tsp garlic powder
1/4 tsp black pepper
Dash of dried parsley

This makes 2 cups of brown gravy mix. Put the dry mix into a plastic baggie for future use.

To Prepare:
Mix the dry gravy mix with 2 cups of cold water in a saucepan. Whisk until smooth. Heat at medium until the sauce thickens. Then.. nothing! You're done! Serve over potatoes, rice, or whatever floats your boat.




(To make a large amount for storage)

2 cups flour
1/2 cup beef bouillon granules
3 T onion powder
3 T cup garlic powder
2 tsp black pepper
1 T dried parsley

Mix it all together; when you want to make 2 cups of gravy, portion out about 3/8 up a cup or 6 tablespoons. When you want to make 1 cup of gravy, simply portion out about 3 tablespoons of the dry mix.

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Tuesday: How to.... DIY Blush

My normal blush on the left and my
DIY blush on the right (both go on about
the same color)
This is a pretty neat DIY trick. It costs just a few cents (Literally, maybe 1?), and leaves a very smooth, even color that blends incredibly well.

Materials
*water
*baby powder (buy it from the dollar store.....)
*red food coloring
-1-2 drops for light pink
-3-4 drops for medium pink
-5-6 drops for red/dark pink

In a bowl, mix your desired amount of food coloring with 3 tablespoons of water. Next, squirt baby powder in, 1-2 teaspoons at a time, and mix until smooth. Continue to add baby powder until the consistency of the mix is almost that of a soft clay and it is no longer all together, but breaks up easily into several pieces. Now, using your fingers, pat the mixture into an empty make-up container (I had one already empty from an old blush) until filled.

Ready to be stored!
To use: You can use it right away, but for best results, allow the mixture to air dry, then press a make-up sponge into the blush and apply to your cheekbones, blending until smooth.

If you feel creative, try mixing in a little yellow for a peachy color or a tiny bit of blue for a bit of a purple hue.
*Note: The color of the blush is MUCH darker wet than dry, so don't be worried if it looks red when you mix it.



UPDATE!
Thought I'd add some extra pictures with their corresponding recipes to help you figure out what works best for you and give you a better idea of how it turns out when finished (since the color is so much lighter dried than wet).

Blue Spoon
Pink Spoon
 Yellow Spoon
Green Spoon
  • 8 drops red
  • ¼ cup water
  • baby powder (until as paste)
  • 6 drops red
  • ¼ cup water
  • baby powder (until as paste)
  • 5 drops red
  • 1 drop blue
  • ¼ cup water
  • baby powder (until as paste)
  • 3 drops red
  • 10 drops yellow
  • ¼ cup water
  • baby powder (until as paste)
Right after mixing- notice how dark they are?
After air drying for about 8 hours

Colors on my hand; in order, right to left
Pink spoon, green spoon, blue spoon, yellow spoon









Looking for more ways to S-T-R-E-T-C-H your beauty budget?
Check out 5 Ways to STRETCH Your Beauty Budget!
src='http://shuttle.sharexy.com/LoaderLite.js'>